Meditation For Pregnancy Pain

Sophie Heller
Meditation For Pregnancy Pain

Meditation is not only safe to practice during pregnancy but actually can have immense benefits for you and your growing baby bump. Although it’s no magic, meditation offers a practice to manage mood swings and understand emotions that may seemingly come from nowhere, sparing no one. Regular meditation can help reduce stress and fears as well as strengthen your immune system and enhance nervous system functioning. More than just physically, meditation builds compassion, connection and confidence, and these advantages are passed to your growing baby. Sounds great, right? Let’s get started.

Most Effective Techniques for Pregnancy Pain

Visualization 

Visualizing relaxing imagery is a fantastic pain management technique that can be used for pregnancy pain and even during labor. Picture each pain or contraction you experience as an ocean wave, follow the sensations as the wave peaks in intensity, and then allow it to slowly wash over you. If you’re feeling particularly overwhelmed, we’d recommend finding a guided visualization meditation on youtube or one of the many meditation apps (personal favorite: insight timer)!

Mantra Meditation

The OM sound, typically chanted at the start and end of yoga classes is the vibrational frequency found in all of nature. Try breathing in and chanting OM on your out breath. Repeat this for five minutes, gradually increasing time as you meditate more. You can use any sound or phrase for a mantra, so perhaps using words like “relax” or even singing a song like ‘Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star’ resonates better with you. Using a calming mantra, whether spoken or thought is a beautiful way to increase connection with your womb and take your mind away from pregnancy pain or discomfort. 

Deep Belly Meditation

Meditation can be as simple as intentional breathing. Find a quiet, and comfortable place to sit where you feel supported and warm. Start by taking a few deep breaths and begin to really tune into your breath and body. Notice where you feel your breath the most. Perhaps it’s the wash of breath in and out of your nose, maybe it’s the rise and fall of your belly, or it could be the sound of your breath. Wherever the sensation is most noticeable, pay attention to that experience and simply breathe normally, allowing whatever experiences or emotions to rise and fall. Try not to label anything as ‘good’ or ‘bad’. Just by sitting to dedicate time to you and your baby, you have already done enough.

Meditation has consistently been proven as an effective way to relieve stress, among other things. And we now know that anything a pregnant woman does to alleviate stress for her, will also reduce stressors for her growing baby. Are you ready to start your prenatal meditation practice?