Moby Makes a Really Cool Case for Veganism — Here's Why

April Saunders
Moby Makes a Really Cool Case for Veganism — Here's Why

In case you missed it, Moby has a new(ish) book out. Entitled Porcelain: A Memoir, it made its debut in May from Penguin Press.

This singer-songwriter has been advocating for veganism and animal-rights with enthusiasm, through his music (1999 album, Play) and later by donating profits to animal welfare from his LA restaurant Little Pine, which opened in 2015 and serves vegan comfort foods.

He has had other vegan cafes in the past, the first of which was Teany and opened in 2002 located in NYCs Lower East Side.

Moby and the Yoga Community

Known for his eclectic, catchy, electronic sound with heartfelt lyrics, Moby has captured the interest of yogis and yoginis around the globe.

He released a free, four-hour album of yoga and meditation music comprised of instrumental tracks that he originally recorded for himself over the years. No beat, no vocals, just quiet, relaxing ambiance.

I have been a fan of Moby’s music for a long time, only discovering his breakthrough 1999 album years after it had been released. 17 years later, I still add his songs to my playlist for yoga class and love the way his sounds transform the studio.

His music works its way into the meditative minds and strong asanas of the students whom I am guiding through their practice.

Moby and Veganism

I knew Moby was a vegan — he has integrated this message into his music, but what I didn’t know was that he had been evangelizing on behalf of vegans everywhere for decades. I decided to do a little research.

The first thing I came across was an article to promote his memoir by Rolling Stones, only to discover that he had done a piece in their opinion section in 2014 entitled “Moby: Why I’m a Vegan.”

He gives personal reasons, like his love of animals which started at a young age, and then goes on to give simple facts and figures to support his lifestyle. One of the messages he portrays is that although he is a practicing vegan and advocates this way of life for others, he does not like forcing his message on others.

“I had the inevitable vegan period wherein I was the insufferable vegan who yelled at his friends every time they ate meat. But over time I realized that when I yelled at my friends, they didn't end up eating less meat, they just ended up getting annoyed with me and not inviting me to their parties. And maybe I'm selfish, but I like getting invited to my friends' parties.”

Moby's Case for Veganism: Interesting Facts and Data

I have gathered some data from Moby’s chapter on veganism, and Rolling Stone’s exposé on animal cruelty in factory farms which published some other interesting facts.

According to Moby:

  • Eating meat and dairy and eggs are to a very large extent responsible for people developing diabetes, heart disease and cancer.
  • Commercial animal production is responsible for 18 percent of climate change (more than every car, bus, truck, boat, and plane combined).
  • Producing a pound of soybeans requires 200 gallons of water but that producing a pound of beef requires 1,800 gallons of water.
  • A leading cause of tropical deforestation is cutting down trees to create grazing land for livestock.
  • Most of zoonotic diseases (SARS, mad cow disease, bird flu, etc.) are the result of animal agriculture.
  • Eating a high fat, animal product-based diet can be a leading cause of impotence.

Did you also know that:

  • 500 million tons of factory-farm animal waste is generated in the US each year.
  • Animals raised for food produce 87,000 pounds of fecal matter per second.
  • 26% of the Earth’s total land mass is used for grazing.
  • There is 130 times more animal waste produced than human waste.
  • 35,000 miles of river across 22 US states have reported pollution by waterways from farm animal excrement.

So just how many animals are being slaughtered a year? (Data in the US, 2014)

  • 9 billion chickens
  • 113 million pigs
  • 33 million cows
  • 250 million turkeys

Keeping with Moby’s message and humility, I would like to celebrate my own decision to become vegan in 2010 and continue to gently advocate for this healthy lifestyle with love and kindness. It has been a HUGE part of my progress as a practicing yogini.

More than a consistent meditation and asana practice, veganism has changed my life in a profound way, granting me a newfound appreciation for practicing ahimsa in a global way, maintaining Sattva in other areas of my life, and taking responsibility for my health and longevity.

Om Shanti.