Yoga One-on-One: Private Yoga Teaching Tips from the Pros



FIND YOUR CLIENTS Tips for Teachers 5 Ways to Find Private Yoga Clients
Private yoga teaching can seem like a daunting task, even if you’re used to teaching in front of a packed class. But it doesn’t have to be!

If you’re thinking of teaching yoga privately, it’s always good to get some tips from the pros. So in order to help you towards your goal, we reached out to some awesome private yoga teachers for some tips and tricks to get you started.

1. Kristin McGee

Credit: Kristin McGee

Credit: Kristin McGee

How has your experience of being a private yoga teacher been?

I’ve loved it from the start. I love meeting people while working privately. It’s hard to hustle and commute and be on all of the time, but it’s still thoroughly enjoyable.

What has surprised you about being a private yoga teacher?

The fun and laughs I have and the friendships I’ve made. I’ve had clients for 15 years now, and it’s amazing to form bonds like that.

What advice would you give to anyone who is trying to make it as a private yoga teacher?

To be confident in setting a rate that you’re worthy of. Also, group clients together in areas so you’re not traveling all over the place.

2. Candace Moore

Credit: Candace

Credit: Candace Moore

How has your experience of being a private yoga teacher been?

Teaching privately is not something I set out to do, it was just something that sort of fell into my hands the more I taught and put myself out there.

What advice would you give to anyone who is trying to make it as a private yoga teacher?

I would advise anyone trying to make it as a private yoga instructor to teach publicly as much as you can. The best way to meet potential regular private clients is through teaching public classes. Always let your classes know you’re available to teach privately.

I’d also suggest developing a social media following. It’s a great way to reach lots of people, and showcase your teaching style and personality — both of which are super important for students choosing an instructor to work with.

3. Cat Kabira

Credit: Cat Kabira

Credit: Cat Kabira

How has your experience of being a private yoga teacher been?

I love teaching privates. I tell all my teachers-in-training to start giving privates immediately. In fact, during our training course I have them give one private in order to see as a teacher how fun and empowering it is.

When we first start teaching we feel daunted by privates thinking that we don’t know enough as teachers to offer anything. What we realize instead, is that by giving a private we, as teachers, are given a chance to go in-depth with someone.

What advice would you give to anyone who is trying to make it as a private yoga teacher?

Advice? Just do it. It’s normal to be terrified, but you’ll realize that during it, time flies and you’re having fun.

There will be the one-off client who isn’t your client..and you’ll know that because you’re either dreading it beforehand (if this is a regular client you’ve seen before) or you feel drained after. So don’t feel like you need to say yes to everyone who wants a private. We all have our people. Have a network of other teachers you can refer them to in case it’s not a good fit.

4. Gigi Yogini

Credit: Gigi Yogini

Credit: Gigi Yogini

How has your experience of being a private yoga teacher been?

My experience as a private yoga instructor has evolved over the past 6 years. I started working with clients in my home which was convenient but slightly invasive. I eventually had such a growing demand for private clients, plus I was starting to produce a lot of instructional yoga videos for myself and other teachers, that I decided to rent a private yoga studio in West Los Angeles.

Eventually, all of my clients were coming to me at my private studio and that made everything a lot easier.

What advice would you give to anyone who is trying to make it as a private yoga teacher?

If a teacher wants advice about teaching privately, here are my suggestions:

  1. Create a clear contract that is signed before your first session.
  2. Learn about your client before you meet to make sure you’re a good fit.
  3. Trust your gut and don’t work with people who make you uncomfortable.
  4. Determine what makes you special compared to other teachers.
  5. Respect your time and your client’s time. Always be professional.

5. Chara Caruthers

Credit: Chara Caruthers

Credit: Chara Caruthers

How has your experience of being a private yoga teacher been?

I really enjoy private teaching. It’s an opportunity to dive a little deeper with individual students and even small groups, connect more closely with them where they are, and provide focused support.

Private teaching has taught me so much about myself, my students and the world in general. It’s given me insights that I’ve been able to channel straight back into my group teaching and my life!

What advice would you give to anyone who is trying to make it as a private yoga teacher?

It’s okay not to have all the answers. Just be open, authentic, and willing to trust your instincts.

Remember that the best way to serve is through connection and holding space. Don’t worry about attracting enough or the right clients. Just know that if you can find it in yourself to be authentically you, your students will find you.

6. Lauren Rudick

Credit: Lauren Rudick

Credit: Lauren Rudick

How has your experience of being a private yoga teacher been?

At first, private yoga was harder than expected! It seemed awkward and I was uncomfortable coming into people’s homes and commanding them. With practice and more confidence in my own teaching it got much better.

Today I am close friends with many of my private clients. They have shared some of their most intimate fears or excitements with me and vice versa. It is a beautiful bond.

What advice would you give to anyone who is trying to make it as a private yoga teacher?

Be patient. Private clients are flaky. They might not stick with yoga for too long. Or they might stay around for years.

7. Corrie Ananda

Credit: Corrie Ananda

Credit: Corrie Ananda

How has your experience of being a private yoga teacher been?

The teaching itself is very rewarding as I get to work in depth with each individual student. The regular one-on-one time with them allows me the opportunity to enter into a deep enquiry with their body/mind/emotions and learn how best to serve them.

What has surprised you about being a private yoga teacher?

How tiring it is. I thought it would be an easier route than group classes. It is a different route, but it is not easier. The travel to and from clients is extensive and very tiring.

The other surprise is my diary. It is in a constant state of flux, and sometimes isn’t fully set until the night before. While there are some clients who like a set time each week, others have very changeable schedules and I often find myself waiting on a client to confirm, which means my day/week isn’t set until the last minute.

What advice would you give to anyone who is trying to make it as a private yoga teacher?

Be professional. Once you have agreed a lesson time with your client, stick to it. Be consistent. Be punctual.

Avoid chit chat during your classes. Your clients may seem familiar to you because you see them once or twice every week, but remember they are paying you to teach them yoga, not to be their friend.

8. Anastasia Shevchenko

Credit: Ana Shevchenko

Credit: Ana Shevchenko

How has your experience of being a private yoga teacher been?

Teaching private classes has been an overall great experience. The key is to find long-term clients who like you and your method. There will be many people who will try a class and never call back, which is fine. There is definitely a very important element of “chemistry.”

A private client should feel especially comfortable with the way you smell, dress, talk, teach, adjust, and guide them slowly through the different elements of yoga.

What I find especially gratifying about teaching privately is having the space and time to see my client go through some kind of a process. It’s very individual and person-specific, but ultimately it is a process of changes that have a positive effect on that person’s life.

What advice would you give to anyone who is trying to make it as a private yoga teacher?

When you teach yoga you bring into it your own bias, which is great because this creates a beautiful variety of approaches, methods, and styles, where both the teacher and the student can find something that works for them best. Never try to appear to be somebody else, to pretend to know something you don’t, or to claim to have experienced something you have not.

Just be you, be human, be real.

9. Laura Malach

Credit: Laura Stean

Credit: Laura Malach

How has your experience of being a private yoga teacher been?

Being a private yoga teacher was one of the biggest decisions I made, and now I am really enjoying it. It definitely took time and a lot of patience to get here. I knew it would be hard work setting up on my own, but I went into the challenge with an open mind and determination.

What has surprised you about being a private yoga teacher?

I am surprised how much I love my students. I love helping people and making them feel better, and it really makes my day when I get a lovely email, message, or comment from a student.

I have definitely met some fantastic friends and wonderful students, and I love seeing them every week.

What advice would you give to anyone who is trying to make it as a private yoga teacher?

Learn to say no — it is hard work. Teaching takes a lot out of you, and as a new teacher you tend to want to say yes to every job that comes up, but this comes with a price. Learn to take time out for yourself and don’t take too much on.

10. Stephanie Klimaszewski

Credit: Stephanie Klimaszewski

Credit: Stephanie Klimaszewski

How has your experience of being a private yoga teacher been?

Private yoga teaching is more challenging than I expected, but also more beautiful. In a private yoga session, there is more accountability as a teacher and a student.

Being with one person and catering to their needs for 60-90 minutes can be scary: you face them as they face themselves. But, as with all moments of accountability and deep awareness, there’s a special power in it.

What has surprised you about being a private yoga teacher?

What it’s taught me. Hands down, my career highlight was teaching a blind woman and her daughter.

After the session, I hopped into a Lyft and couldn’t help but gush to my driver. He asked a great question: “Did she do anything better than the average student because she was blind?” Absolutely. She listened to her breath.

What advice would you give to anyone who is trying to make it as a private yoga teacher?

The importance of the two Ps: personalization and preparation. You may not consider private yoga a “sale,” but it is. You’re selling a feeling. It’s key to make your client feel heard, special, and catered to.

11. Celestine Lau

Credit: Celestine Lau

Credit: Celestine Lau

How has your experience of being a private yoga teacher been?

It is a very rewarding experience being a private yoga teacher, but there are many challenges: some expected, and some unexpected. Just like all regular occupations, it is possible to pack too many classes in and become totally burnt out after mindless teaching without cultivating your own practice, so make sure to take the time for your own practice as well.

What has surprised you about being a private yoga teacher

Often I am surprised at how students progress at different paces, but all reach their ultimate achievement. Being able to help students reach their goals makes life a lot more meaningful.

What advice would you give to anyone who is trying to make it as a private yoga teacher?

I would have been more prepared if I knew the reality of the amount of sacrifices needed to be a yoga teacher and a business person at the same time. It can be trying to strike a balance at times.

12. Dana Slamp

Credit: Dana Slamp

Credit: Dana Slamp

How has your experience of being a private yoga teacher been?

At first, teaching privates was harder for me. I just taught a normal class with more adjustments. Thankfully, it was received well.

What has surprised you about being a private yoga teacher?

It’s deeply rewarding, and a chance to support a student in their personal evolution.

What advice would you give to anyone who is trying to make it as a private yoga teacher?

Always figure in your travel time when charging for private yoga, and incentivize them with a discount for buying a package. Yoga works with consistency.

13. Dana Kraft

Credit: Dana Kraft

Credit: Dana Kraft

How has your experience of being a private yoga teacher been?

I enjoy being a private yoga teacher. Teaching private yoga can be extremely fulfilling because you have the opportunity to know your clients over time and create a special bond with them. Teaching private yoga is different in that you are spending consistent time with them and helping them to set intentions that will lead to a healthier mind, body, and spirit.

What has surprised you about being a private yoga teacher?

How many interesting people there are out there!

What advice would you give to anyone who is trying to make it as a private yoga teacher?

I would say to create a healthy work life balance, and know when you are spreading yourself too thin. Try to keep your private clients in one area, so that you aren’t driving all over. It can take a toll on you if you are in the car all the time. Always have your business cards on you, too! You never know who you will meet and where.

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Has their advice helped inspire you to start teaching privately? Share your thoughts with us in the comments below!

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